The Complexities of Love: Thoughts on Burning – February 27, 2016

A modern adaptation of classic plays is a mainstay across all entertainment mediums, and sometimes the subtle changes in the adaptations can bring forth a new interpretation of the original source material as the core themes remain intact. The story of Cyrano de Bergerac is a familiar one, probably best known in popular culture as the Steve Martin film Roxanne, but while that modern adaptation is a mostly humorous (as was the original play), Burning, the modern adaptation written by Ginger Lazarus and presented by the Resonance Ensemble, is somber and thought provoking. I became aware of this adaptation through a friend of mine, who knew one of the actors in the play (which had its world premiere at the Theatre at Saint Clement’s), and asked if I would be interested in going. While I did not have a chance to see the Resonance Ensemble’s production of Cyrano de Bergerac, performed in rep with Burning, I had seen the most recent Broadway production of Cyrano, and so I was already familiar with the nuances of the story.

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Burning is set in an unnamed American town located near an Army base, circa 2008, and the “twist” in this adaptation is the titular character is female, and the external deformity from which the classic Cyrano’s insecurities derived transforms into an internal struggle this modern Cyrano, renamed Cy Burns, carries within her due to her experiences as a gay soldier. Another addition to the adaptation is the discussion and disclosure of the mistreatment of female soldiers in the US Army before the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”, which accentuates the solemnity of an otherwise romantic comedy. Like the original titular character, Cy is adept at using her words (in this case via blog entries) to provoke her enemies and to help the tongue tied soldier Cole woo Rose, a local painter with whom she is also enamored. The antagonist of this adaptation presents itself in the form of Dulac, a high ranking Army officer with a belligerent history with Cy. The overall narrative follows the same story structure of the source material, with unexpected twists at its conclusion.

The set design is minimalist, contained mainly in the general store Cy owns and runs, with the requisite props that entails. The cast of five was amazing, most notably Catherine Curtin as Cy, who balanced her rage at Dulac for disregarding the mistreatment of female soldiers within the Army system with her awkwardness with Rose whenever Rose talks of Cole, as well as her maternal care for Sammy, a young man wishing to escape the small town world in search for a purpose. Also notable was Chris Ceraso as Dulac (parallel to the Comte de Guiche in the original play), whose adherence to duty provides added fuel to Cy’s cause; his interest in Rose comes across subtly and is all the more menacing in context to the action that occurs towards the end of the play.

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There wasn’t so much of a stage door experience, this time ‘round, as there was a talkback moderated by Rachel Reiner, managing director of the Resonance Ensemble with Eric Parness, the play’s director, and the cast after the performance (unbeknownst to me) discussing the origins of the play, its journey from workshop to stage, and the issues imparted within the play. The director and the managing director were alumni of Brandeis University, and there were many other Brandeis alumni in attendance; after the talkback many of the alumni gathered onstage, and I didn’t feel like intruding on that (or waiting afterwards, not knowing how long that would last).

The transformation of a French romantic comedy into an American drama deserves another life after this run, which ends today (February 28, 2016), having performed in rep with Cyrano all this month (yesterday was my only opportunity to see the show). It’s a different yet familiar take on the story of an outspoken yet insecure soldier yearning to find love and acceptance despite the self-perceived obstacles that stand in the way.

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Clowning Around: Musings on Old Hats – February 6, 2016

Comedy is subjective.

What is funny to some might be offensive to others; one needs to take into account cultural, ethnic and religious context in which the humor may be taken. On the other hand, there are some things that are universally and eternally amusing for all, regardless of age, race, and political sensibilities. Old Hats, currently playing on the Irene Diamond Stage at The Pershing Square Signature Center falls in the latter category. I obtained tickets via the TDF ticket raffle table at the BC/EFA Flea Market & Auction (the final pair from last year’s batch), anticipating a enjoyable afternoon of hilarity.

I was not disappointed.

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Old Hats harkens back to the days of vaudeville, with master clowns Bill Irwin and David Shiner performing a series of skits, many of which were performed in mime, with a the off stage band providing the necessary (percussive) sound effects to accentuate the action. Between skits were songs written and sung by Shaina Taub – oftentimes she interacted with the pair, as both a comic foil and as a catalyst. The stage was designed to resemble a traditional vaudeville stage, with a gold fringed red curtain and show card displaying the skit title, situated on the right. In conjunction with the traditional props is the inclusion of technology – the use of visual projections with which Irwin and Shiner use to brilliant effect. Audience interaction and participation is another component of the show, with the actors interacting with (those fortunate enough to be) sitting in the front row, and bringing audience members onstage for a bit of improvisation.

The stage door experience was relaxed – as the show was playing at one of the many stages within the Signature Center, there was one area from where all the actors exit, which spills into the café / lobby area on the second floor of the building. A small throng gathered haphazardly around this area, with playbills and other items to be signed; the cast were affable, chatting with those waiting, signing playbills and posing for photos.

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Needless to say I highly recommend seeing the show – it appeals to all ages and is a welcome tonic to the political correctness of most comedy shows and refrains (for the most part) from including any overt innuendo that might come across as offensive. Old Hats is playing from now until April 3, 2016. For more information, visit: http://www.signaturetheatre.org/tickets/production.aspx?pid=4307

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