Once-a-Year Day – Adventures at the Broadway Cares /Equity Fights AIDS Flea Market & Grand Auction

Broadway Cares / Equity Fights AIDS (BC/EFA) is a stellar organization that supports a variety of social causes, and has a multitude of fundraising events throughout the year. One of their most popular events is the annual Flea Market & Grand Auction, held on the last Sunday in September, often referred to as “Broadway Christmas”, as fans can obtain almost everything theatre related, from vintage and contemporary playbills and /or posters (signed and unsigned) to prop pieces and costumes worn on stage, as well as the typical flea market items (books, CDs, and baked goods). There’s also an autograph table with a rotating list of theater actors, a silent auction for unique (usually signed) items, and the Grand Auction, where extraordinary experiences such as walk-on roles for specific shows, backstage tours and opening night tickets for next season’s shows are up for the bidding. The Flea Market & Grand Auction starts at 10 AM and ends at 7PM (the Grand Auction starts around 5PM – I think. I never stick around to watch the Grand Auction, as it’s somewhat distressing to not be able to afford the starting bid for such unique experiences; besides, by that time I’m usually exhausted and out of funds.)

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There are a multitude of tables, most of which are show specific, selling memorabilia from their shows, but by far my favorite table is the TDF Pik-a-Tkt table, where you can win a pair of tickets to Broadway and off-Broadway (and sometimes off-off Broadway) shows. It’s one of the most popular tables, and (in my opinion) one of the most addictive, and probably one that raises a lot of money. The premise is simple: there are three medium sized containers full of (stapled) raffle tickets; if one of the raffles has a winning stamp, you are awarded a white envelope with a pair of tickets, or a voucher good for two tickets. The envelopes are sealed, and are randomly selected by the volunteers working the table, so there’s a level of suspense and (sweet) anticipation of finding out the winning show. Then there’s the “trading pen” – well it’s it’s not really a pen per se, but it is a quasi-contained and designated area where raffle winners confer with one another to maximize their winnings by either straight trading for different shows or change show dates. It’s a kind of networking and semi-collaborative effort to get the shows (and the date) you want, and a pretty good way to get to know fellow fans.

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I’ve mentioned the BC/EFA and its Flea Market & Auction in most of my entries, as it’s usually the source of where I’ve obtained tickets to the many shows I’ve seen (and blogged about) thus far. I’ve attended the Flea Market & Auction for the past fifteen years, and in recent years I’ve spent the bulk of my day actively participating in the TDF table, usually winning a multitude of tickets every year, sometimes making good trades, and sometimes not (depending on which shows I’ve won and my willingness to trade). I also spend the day perusing the other tables picking up interesting trinkets or CDs, almost always taking copious amount photos of items for sale (for posterity), wishing I had the funds to purchase them. Even though there are designated tables where credit cards are accepted, I always bring a set amount of cash with me, thus limiting my spending ability (and to ensure that I don’t bankrupt myself inadvertently). It’s also a day on which I can easily see friends I’ve met through the various shows I’ve seen (usually bonding at the stage door), friends I’ve known since high school and “friends” I’ve encountered and interacted with at the TDF table (usually in the trading area.

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As it’s an outdoor event literally in and around Shubert Alley, weather is a key element. The weather is almost always fair in temperature, sometimes with overcast skies; sometimes it’s warmer than usual and sunny. There was one year when it was indoors (at the now closed) Roseland Ballroom due to the torrential rain. In years past, West 44th Street was closed off so that the entire street (and sidewalks on either side were full of people looking for great deals on theatre-related items, which resulted in congestion and crowds around the more popular tables. There had been a few years when the pedestrian areas in the middle of Times Square were used to station tables, which spread out the Flea Market experience. The 2016 Flea Market was different than it had been in previous years in that only half of West 44th Street was cordoned off for tables, allowing for ongoing (one way) traffic the other half of the street. The flea market then wrapped around to West 45th Street with the same configuration, and was limited to that city block; Shubert Alley remained in use as it always had been, and the use of the pedestrian areas in Times Square proper were not utilized. I suppose this was done to ease traffic (for cars and people alike) in the area, as Times Square is already a popular and (usually) overpopulated area on any good day.

It’s always a fun day and a great start to the new Broadway season. As the title of this entry says, it’s my Once-a-Year Day, where I have loads of fun, meet up with friends and find the most unique theater-related items (and win lots and lots of show tickets). All the proceeds go to a worthy cause and helps scores of people throughout the City and across the country. For more information about Broadway Cares and the other Events it holds, visit their website: https://broadwaycares.org/

Where Everything is New: Something Rotten! CD signing at Barnes & Noble – July 16, 2015

Another cast recording release, another CD signing – Barnes & Noble recently held a CD signing for the (physical copy of the) cast recording of Something Rotten!, including a three-song performance from the cast. These performances/signings occurred at the Barnes & Noble store on the Upper East Side (on 86th Street), which logistically makes (somewhat) sense for currently running shows, since the cast would arrive at the CD signing (which started at 4PM), perform and sign CDs then head to the theatre for the evening’s performance.

Something Rotten! CD signing Sign

As I often do, I arrived at the Barnes & Noble that morning to get the CD and the [peach] wristband that ensured me a seat inside the event. Of course, if you’ve followed the (few) blog posts I’ve written about CD signings, you’ll know that even though the [peach] wristband guarantees priority seating, I still camp out outside the event space to ensure a front row seat (I know I don’t really have to, I do it anyway), listening to the cast recording on repeat on my iPod. Other people started to arrive around a bit before noon, and I saw a few of the familiar faces I usually see at these events, which makes the time pass at a faster pace.

The cast trickled in shortly before the event start to conduct sound check (it’s always a fun to watch (and take copious amounts of photos of) the “pre-show” and see the cast go through the motions before the performance). Once again, Barnes & Noble Event manager Steven Sorrentino greeted the (very enthusiastic) crowd and introduced each song, accompanied by a pre-recorded backing track (as opposed to a piano accompanist). First to the stage were cast members Brian d’Arcy James and John Cariani singing “God, I Hate Shakespeare”, followed by Kate Reinders and John Cariani singing “I Love the Way” and ended with Christian Borle singing “Hard to be the Bard”.

Brian d'Arcy James & John Cariani - "God, I Hate Shakespeare"

Brian d’Arcy James & John Cariani – “God, I Hate Shakespeare”

Top: Kate Reinders & John Cariani - "I Love The Way" Bottom: Christian Borle - "Hard to Be the Bard"

Top: Kate Reinders & John Cariani – “I Love The Way” Bottom: Christian Borle – “Hard to Be the Bard”

Additional cast members Heidi Blickenstaff, Brad Oscar, and Michael James Scott joined the aforementioned for the customary (mini) press photo session before assuming their seats for the CD signing. The line moved at an even pace, even with the press photographers (and those waiting in line – including me) snapping photos as the CD booklets was passed down the table. There wasn’t as much chatting amongst the cast and those waiting, as there was a huge line of people waiting, and (as mentioned earlier) the cast had a 8PM show to perform.

From left to right: Michael James Scott, Heidi Blickenstaff, John Cariani, Brad Oscar, Kate Reinders, Brian d'Arcy James and Christian Borle

From left to right: Michael James Scott, Heidi Blickenstaff, John Cariani, Brad Oscar, Kate Reinders, Brian d’Arcy James and Christian Borle

The cast recording of Something Rotten! is hilarious and the show (as I understand it, as I have yet to see it, due to financial constraints) is a reminiscent of Spamalot and The Producers, with a dash of The Drowsy Chaperone  and a plethora of Shakespeare (obviously). There are hundreds (thousands?) of references to other musicals, both in the lyrics and the music, and the overall sound of the score reminds me of other great musical scores, both from the “Golden Age” as well as contemporary scores. It’s a delightful cast recording for any musical theatre fan – they’ll be laughing and singing along with the cast (as well as making a checklist of all the musical theatre references).

I also hope someone, somewhere will actually write Omlette The Musical.

Something Rotten! signed CD booklet

Brady vs. Partridge: The Bardy Bunch at 54 Below – June 21, 2015

The Bradys and Partridges are movin’ on up…

Oh wait – wrong (classic) TV show.

As mentioned in previous blog posts, I’ve been a fan of The Bardy Bunch: The War of the Families Partridge and Brady, written by Stephen Garvey, since I saw the production four years ago in the Ellen Stewart Theatre at La MaMa (located downtown in the East Village), during the New York International Fringe Festival. Since then, the show has undergone some (minor) script changes as it continues its trek uptown, having most recently played at the Theatre at St. Clement’s (located on 46th Street between 9th and 10th Avenue) last spring. The latest stop on its (hopefully inevitable) journey to the Great White Way reached 54 Below (located at 54th Street between 7th and 8th Avenue), where musical theatre performers perform intimate cabaret shows.

Bardy Bunch at 54 Below

The performance I attended was an encore presentation (the first show happened a month prior), and was more of a mini-concert than excerpts from the stage production. Yet the overall premise was similar: the Bradys and Partridges crossed paths due to an inadvertent double booking and took turns to win over the audience. Several of the iconic songs from The Brady Bunch and The Partridge Family were sung, along with other notable ‘70s songs – fitting given the reputation of the venue. Some of the Shakespearean elements from the stage production were sprinkled throughout. Many of the cast remained the same from previous incarnations, and expertly used the intimacy of the venue to their advantage, weaving between the tables and interacting with the audience to their great amusement.

Bardy Bunch 54 Below

For more information about The Bardy Bunch: The War of the Families Partridge and Brady, please visit their website: thebardybunch.com.

Bardy Bunch cast list

Dance With Never A Care: An American in Paris CD signing at Barnes & Noble – June 12, 2015

So, it’s been a while since I attended a CD signing, or seen a show for that matter – but that has more to do with finances than lack of interest; there are so many shows (new and ongoing), yet not as much time to go see them all (and then there’s the exorbitant ticket prices…). Nevertheless, attending a CD signing is almost always within my budget, and more times than not, cast members perform songs from their show, which is always a draw.  As mentioned in past CD signing blog entries, I don’t/can’t always attend every CD signing Barnes & Noble, (and I’m grateful that Barnes & Noble is still around so events such as these can take place), I always make an effort to attend one in which I have an interest, which leads me to the recently released cast recording of An American in Paris. Along with the CD signing, the event included performances from the cast, held at the Barnes & Noble store on the Upper East Side (on 86th Street).

An American In Paris CD signing banner

Per usual, I arrived at that Barnes & Noble early to get the CD at the main register (though I had purchased the cast recording via iTunes before they announced the CD signing) and received my [silver] wristband to guarantee a seat inside the event. Also, per usual, I staked out my “usual” spot outside the event area to start the attendance line, listening to the cast recording on repeat on my iPod (other people started to arrive around noon, and the crowd steadily gathered afterwards). For events such as these, I often see the same bunch of people waiting in line, and struck up conversations with them while we all waited – it’s usually the only time I see these (same) people, and the camaraderie that emerges from these quasi-occasional events is special in its own way.

Cast members arrived roughly an hour before the event start [4:30PM] to conduct a sound check, and we were ushered into the room shortly before the event start. Barnes & Noble Event manager Steven Sorrentino greeted the crowd and introduced to the makeshift stage cast members Leanne Cope, Robert Fairchild, Max von Essen, Jill Paice, and Brandon Uranowitz. First, Robert Fairchild and Jill Paice sang “Shall We Dance?”, who were then joined by Leanne Cope and Max von Essen to sing “For You, For Me, For Evermore”, which segued to Brandon Uranowitz and Jill Paice singing an emotional “But Not For Me”. The performance section ended with Robert Fairchild, Max von Essen and Brandon Uranowitz singing (in three part harmony!) “‘S Wonderful”, all of which were greeted with great applause from the crowd.

Top row: Jill Paice & Robert Fairchild (Shall We Dance?), Leanne Cope & Max Von Essen (For You, For Me, For Evermore) Bottom row: Jill Paice & Brandon Uranowitz (But Not For Me), Robert Fairchild, Brandon Uranowitz & Max von Essen ('S Wonderful)

Top row: Jill Paice & Robert Fairchild (Shall We Dance?), Leanne Cope & Max Von Essen (For You, For Me, For Evermore) Bottom row: Jill Paice & Brandon Uranowitz (But Not For Me), Robert Fairchild, Brandon Uranowitz & Max von Essen (‘S Wonderful)

After the customary (mini) press photo session (at which the press photographers in attendance stood in front of the seated audience (I managed to snap a few photos during the portion of the event), the signing took place, wherein the aforementioned cast members sat at the table to sign the CDs (plus a few other memorabilia). They greeted and (sometimes) briefly chatted with the attendees, while the press photographers were taking photos of the proceedings. As there was a long line of people, and the knowledge that the cast members were time constrained (due to the fact that they’d need to be back at the theatre for their show that evening), I didn’t linger around (though I kinda wish I had).

From left to right: Robert Fairchild, Jill Paice, Brandon Uranowitz, Leanne Cope & Max von Essen

From left to right: Robert Fairchild, Jill Paice, Brandon Uranowitz, Leanne Cope & Max von Essen

Needless to say, An American in Paris is one of the new shows I need to see, with its lush Gershwin score, as well as its choreography and exquisite scenic and lighting design, (for which it won the 2015 Tony Award). Amid the jukebox musicals and the long running standards, it’s lovely to hear the music and lyrics from George and Ira Gershwin back on Broadway.

Actually, it’s more than lovely – ‘S Wonderful.

An American in Paris Signed CD booklet

Coming Up Roses: Thoughts on Mama Rose’s Turn – The True Story of America’s Most Notorious Stage Door Mother

Mention the phrase “stage door mother” and the first thought on most people’s minds is Mama Rose, the mother of Gypsy Rose Lee and June Havoc, in the musical Gypsy; for avid theater fans, this line of thinking can (and usually will) lead to a discussion/debate on the various actors who have portrayed the larger-than-life character on stage, screen and television since the musical’s debut in 1959. Yet the character as depicted in the musical, as well as some of the events that occur in the musical were loosely based on Gypsy Rose Lee’s memoirs, as discovered by Carolyn Quinn in her book, Mama Rose’s Turn – The True Story of America’s Most Notorious Stage Door Mother, which recently was dramatized in conjunction with the Ziegfeld Society on February 22, 2014.

Mama Rose's Turn playbill

[Disclaimer: Once again for the sake of full disclosure, Carolyn Quinn is one of the good friends I met during my (almost) year of seeing the 2010-2011 revival production of La Cage aux Folles. As always, the opinions and musings stated in this blog are my own, with no influence from the author whatsoever.]

While the book was published last November, (at which time there was a discussion and book signing), I have yet to read her book (though it’s on my never-ending “to read” list). The dramatic summation of her book began with Loria Parker, playing the role of Rose, reenacting Gypsy’s act one finale, singing out the showstopper “Everything’s Comin’ Up Roses” only to be interrupted by the narrator, who proceeded to tell the true life story of Rose Hovick, with the aid of archival photos. During the narration, there were several period-specific songs such as “I Want To Be A Janitor’s Child” and “Hard Boiled Rose” sung by June and Louise, portrayed by Merrill Grant and Vanessa Altshuler, respectively (piano accompaniment provided by Mark York from the Ziegfeld Society), and a few dialogue driven scenes in between songs, wherein the narrator assumed the role of various other characters who interacted (mainly) with Rose.

Mama Rose cast

From left to right: Author & Narrator Carolyn Quinn, Merrill Grant (June Havoc), Loria Parker (Rose Hovick) & Vanessa Altshuler (Gypsy Rose Lee)

The show was informative and entertaining, and the three actors portraying Rose, June and Gypsy were fantastic in their respective roles, capturing the spirit of those three memorable personages, with some of the inconsistencies and myths surrounding the family explained. The show’s content was thoroughly researched by the author with the aim of providing (for the first time) an accurate biography of such an iconic figure in entertainment history. To date, there is no word of whether this show will have a future, but considering the popularity of Gypsy and the character of Mama Rose (or at least the archetype she represents), there will always be an interest and fascination for this legendary character. While this production was put together in a short period of time (four days, to be precise) I do hope there will be an expanded version with a full cast – perhaps even billed as a companion to Gypsy – in the years to come.

To paraphrase Stephen Sondheim’s brilliant lyrics, it’s about time Mama Rose had her turn to have her own dream to be in the spotlight.

Love, All Ways: Mandy Gonzalez at 54 Below – December 4, 2013

Best known for her roles in In the Heights and Wicked, Mandy Gonzalez is a Broadway singer/actress with a considerable vocal range who recently made her cabaret debut at 54 Below singing an eclectic mix of songs from her various stage roles and pop/rock songs. She is also a quasi-acquaintance of mine (somewhere between being a fan and a friend), as I had first met her when she was in the short-lived Dance of the Vampires and was blown away by her impressive vocals (and probably one of the few actors that I have seen on stage who could match the vocal intensity to share the stage with Michael Crawford as they had when they sung “Total Eclipse of the Heart”). When I had first met her at the stage door all those years ago, I recall telling her that she’d be a Broadway star, and sure enough, she has fulfilled that prophesy.

 Mandy Gonzalez at 54 Below

54 Below is a perfect venue for her to make her cabaret debut, as that space is intimate as well as infamous – its location (as the venue name suggests) was where the famed Studio 54 was located, not too far from the Times Square area. The venue itself is relatively new, having opened in June 2012, and has quickly become a hub for theatre cabaret shows, with the likes of Patti LuPone, Norbert Leo Butz, Aaron Tveit, Sherie Rene Scott (to name but a few) taking to the stage to perform to an audience that are at arm’s length from the stage.

54 Below

Dressed in a black sequin top and black leather pants, Mandy started the show with a bit of “Defying Gravity” from Wicked, exuding lots of spunk and sass before segueing into a brief fit of nerves from doing her first solo show, to which the musical director advised her to just “Breathe” (a reference to one of her songs from In the Heights). She didn’t sing all of “Defying Gravity”, as she wanted us to “get to know her better” before she went on to belt that song out (which garnered some laughs).Among the non-theatrical songs she proceeded to sing (and belt) were “A Little Less Conversation”, originally sung by Elvis Presley, Prince’s “Kiss”, and the Queen song “Crazy Thing Called Love”; she also sang The Temptations’ song “Get Ready” both with an upbeat tempo and also as a haunting torch song – in between these two renditions she spoke of her family and their influence on her life and career. She then spoke of her parents and the love letters they had written to one another early in their courtship and remarked how her father would sign his letters “Love always” but spelling it “wrong” so that it read “love all ways”, which no doubt was the inspiration behind her naming her first cabaret show “Love, All Ways”. She then sang “Total Eclipse of the Heart” (the longer version of the song with its original lyrics), which was greeted with much applause and cheering, especially as she belted out and riffed the final notes as she had done at the final performance of Dance of the Vampires. There was also a portion of the show dedicated to her experiences in In the Heights, including a confession that she never really learned how to speak Spanish growing up, and how there had been several different songs for her character Nina’s first song in the show – she sang one of those songs (I can’t remember the exact title) then sang “Breathe”, the song that ended up in the show. At the end, she finally sang the entirety of “Defying Gravity” which earned her a standing ovation from the audience. For an encore, she sang “The Best in the World” from A Day in Hollywood / A Night in the Ukraine as a tribute to Priscilla Lopez, her co-star in In the Heights, who had originally sung; Ms. Lopez was in the audience, and Mandy had acknowledged her as being a valued friend and inspiration.

Mandy Gonzalez

She lingered about after the show, greeting friends and fans alike, posing for photos and such, conversant and personable as she always is. Though she only performed for one night, there has been talk of future shows (including a return engagement at 54 Below some time in 2014!) and I sincerely hope there will be more opportunities for those in New York City (and perhaps elsewhere) to hear her amazing voice and experience her vivacious personality.

Me and Mandy

Sarah Brightman in Concert: Dreamchaser World Tour – September 21, 2013

From her early days as a member of the dance troupe Hot Gossip to her success as a classical crossover recording artist, with a brief segue into musical theatre in Cats and Phantom of the Opera, Sarah Brightman is perhaps one of the best known, and best-selling sopranos in the world. As stated in a previous blog, Sarah Brightman is one of my favorite recording artists, and one of the few who tours regularly in the United States; I first discovered her while listening to the Original London cast recording of Phantom of the Opera, and continued to follow her solo recording career. She is credited with creating the classical crossover genre, as her albums have featured songs (both original and covers) that blend classical singing with pop, rock, and world music influences, and sung in various languages. Many of her albums are thematic, with the songs creating an atmosphere that complements the theme – Dive had a watery theme, the moon was a central theme in La Luna and Harem had an Arabian influence. Her latest album, Dreamchaser, continues this trend, as it touches upon space exploration, a very relevant theme for Ms. Brightman, as she has announced her intention to travel to space in 2015.

Sarah Brightman Dreamchaser

I have been fortunate to have seen her in concert several times, and her concerts, much like her albums have been extraordinary and eclectic. The New York stop on the Dreamchaser tour was at Radio City Music Hall, where I had first seen her sing in concert; if this album and accompanying tour is to be her final concert before her trip into space, it is curious and somewhat fitting that my concert going experience has come full circle. Also has stated previously, the American leg of this tour was to have taken place in February, but had been postponed until now, for reasons unexplained – this postponement was actually a bit fortuitous, as it had snowed heavily on the intended date I was to attend her concert. As I am a member of her official fan club, I was able to purchase my ticket during the pre-sale period, which allowed me to obtain a good seat in the orchestra section (left side) at Radio City Music Hall. Upon entering the historic concert venue and being ushered to my seat, I was overwhelmed at the prospect of being back there after so many years, as her concerts were usually held at Madison Square Garden, which is a much larger venue than Radio City Music Hall.

It was apparent that this concert was a more intimate experience than her previous concerts, as there were four musicians on stage and two backup dancers; also new to this concert was the large screen that projected thematic images mainly space or nature-related, as well as the use of different colored spotlights that crisscrossed the stage, which emphasized the ethereal aspect of the Dreamchaser album.

Her concert started off with the first three songs from Dreamchaser – appropriately, as the curtain raised Ms. Brightman appeared in a full length black dress aloft on a platform with an ethereal  blue-white light behind her as she sang “Angel”, which segued to a colorful nebula imagery for “One Day Like This”. A scarlet tinged sunrise accompanied “Glósoli”; the two backup dancers performed as Ms. Brightman reappeared in a white full length dress to sing “Hijo De La Luna” and “La Luna” amid a full moon. Futuristic space images reappeared for “Eperdu” followed by electrifying lightning images (red, blue and purple) which accompanied “It’s A Beautiful Day”; the bright white light returned with Ms. Brightman once again lifted a few feet from the stage for “Ave Maria”. At this point, she introduced tenor Erkan Aki to sing the duet “Canto Della Terra” for which there was water drop images projected behind them; the end of the first act had her singing “Nessun Dorma” on the raised platform with the close up image of a planet behind her.

Dreamchaser Act 1

After the brief intermission (during which I encountered old and new friends who were also in attendance), the second act opened with “Closer” with Ms. Brightman flanked by the two backup dancers, with black and white circles projected on the screens, creating a dizzying effect. The song “Breathe Me” brought back the space theme, with the screens projecting a lone satellite traveling through the universe. The screens were not used for the next quartet of songs, but rather left most the stage in darkness, with only a line of spotlights as the source of light in descending color order: purple and blue for “Figlio Perduto”, green for “Kaze No Toorimichi”, golden-yellow for “Scarborough Fair”, and a brief return to blue for “A Song of India”. This contrast in lighting was inspired, as the screen shone dark red as the pulsating rhythm of “Phantom of the Opera” fill the air (and greeting with much cheering) – this was the only song that harkened back to her musical theatre days, and perhaps this is the first time she did not sing “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again” (the Phantom section of her concert usually included “Twisted Every Way”, which segued into “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again”, followed by “Phantom of the Opera” and initially included “Music of the Night”). Once again, tenor  Erkan Aki reappeared to sing the Phantom’s portion of the duet (as an ardent fan of Phantom of the Opera, I have heard many singers tackle this song, and Mr. Aki was pretty good). The final song was “Time to Say Goodbye”, best known as a duet, but she sang it as a solo with the screens showing red candles floating upside down, to which fireworks were added during the final chorus.

For the encore section, the space motif returned with a star-dotted black sky and an occasional shooting star for “Venus and Mars” with the stars swirling as if we were about to make a jump into hyperspace (I’m also a huge Star Wars fan, and that’s what the imagery looked like to me). Her final song was “A Question of Honor” (and quite possibly my favorite song of hers) – the screens initially showed the classic image of the bottom portion of the earth, which soon changed to relate the early space race between the Americans and Russians, with historical footage from that era. This was a brilliant use of imagery that complemented and brought new meaning to the song, as it was originally the official song for a boxing match, with lyric references to two opposing sides colliding. This was a spectacular end to her concert, which was greeting with cheers, applause and a rousing standing ovation.

Dreamchaser Act 2

Seeing Sarah Brightman in concert is always a visual and audio feast, and the Dreamchaser concert was one worth remembering – while not as elaborate as previous tours, the sparse and intimate atmosphere was suited to the venue and created a unique journey through space, bringing to life Ms. Brightman’s dream of space travel, a dream I hope she fulfills.