Dance With Never A Care: An American in Paris CD signing at Barnes & Noble – June 12, 2015

So, it’s been a while since I attended a CD signing, or seen a show for that matter – but that has more to do with finances than lack of interest; there are so many shows (new and ongoing), yet not as much time to go see them all (and then there’s the exorbitant ticket prices…). Nevertheless, attending a CD signing is almost always within my budget, and more times than not, cast members perform songs from their show, which is always a draw.  As mentioned in past CD signing blog entries, I don’t/can’t always attend every CD signing Barnes & Noble, (and I’m grateful that Barnes & Noble is still around so events such as these can take place), I always make an effort to attend one in which I have an interest, which leads me to the recently released cast recording of An American in Paris. Along with the CD signing, the event included performances from the cast, held at the Barnes & Noble store on the Upper East Side (on 86th Street).

An American In Paris CD signing banner

Per usual, I arrived at that Barnes & Noble early to get the CD at the main register (though I had purchased the cast recording via iTunes before they announced the CD signing) and received my [silver] wristband to guarantee a seat inside the event. Also, per usual, I staked out my “usual” spot outside the event area to start the attendance line, listening to the cast recording on repeat on my iPod (other people started to arrive around noon, and the crowd steadily gathered afterwards). For events such as these, I often see the same bunch of people waiting in line, and struck up conversations with them while we all waited – it’s usually the only time I see these (same) people, and the camaraderie that emerges from these quasi-occasional events is special in its own way.

Cast members arrived roughly an hour before the event start [4:30PM] to conduct a sound check, and we were ushered into the room shortly before the event start. Barnes & Noble Event manager Steven Sorrentino greeted the crowd and introduced to the makeshift stage cast members Leanne Cope, Robert Fairchild, Max von Essen, Jill Paice, and Brandon Uranowitz. First, Robert Fairchild and Jill Paice sang “Shall We Dance?”, who were then joined by Leanne Cope and Max von Essen to sing “For You, For Me, For Evermore”, which segued to Brandon Uranowitz and Jill Paice singing an emotional “But Not For Me”. The performance section ended with Robert Fairchild, Max von Essen and Brandon Uranowitz singing (in three part harmony!) “‘S Wonderful”, all of which were greeted with great applause from the crowd.

Top row: Jill Paice & Robert Fairchild (Shall We Dance?), Leanne Cope & Max Von Essen (For You, For Me, For Evermore) Bottom row: Jill Paice & Brandon Uranowitz (But Not For Me), Robert Fairchild, Brandon Uranowitz & Max von Essen ('S Wonderful)

Top row: Jill Paice & Robert Fairchild (Shall We Dance?), Leanne Cope & Max Von Essen (For You, For Me, For Evermore) Bottom row: Jill Paice & Brandon Uranowitz (But Not For Me), Robert Fairchild, Brandon Uranowitz & Max von Essen (‘S Wonderful)

After the customary (mini) press photo session (at which the press photographers in attendance stood in front of the seated audience (I managed to snap a few photos during the portion of the event), the signing took place, wherein the aforementioned cast members sat at the table to sign the CDs (plus a few other memorabilia). They greeted and (sometimes) briefly chatted with the attendees, while the press photographers were taking photos of the proceedings. As there was a long line of people, and the knowledge that the cast members were time constrained (due to the fact that they’d need to be back at the theatre for their show that evening), I didn’t linger around (though I kinda wish I had).

From left to right: Robert Fairchild, Jill Paice, Brandon Uranowitz, Leanne Cope & Max von Essen

From left to right: Robert Fairchild, Jill Paice, Brandon Uranowitz, Leanne Cope & Max von Essen

Needless to say, An American in Paris is one of the new shows I need to see, with its lush Gershwin score, as well as its choreography and exquisite scenic and lighting design, (for which it won the 2015 Tony Award). Amid the jukebox musicals and the long running standards, it’s lovely to hear the music and lyrics from George and Ira Gershwin back on Broadway.

Actually, it’s more than lovely – ‘S Wonderful.

An American in Paris Signed CD booklet

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Just a Little Touch of Star Quality: Ruminations on Evita – January 18, 2013

A healthy dose of charisma and ambition coupled with excellent networking skills and good timing can almost always guarantee success in all aspects of life, though rising to fame and fortune from humble beginnings does have its dangers as well. Such is the case in Evita, based on the life of Eva Peron, the famous or infamous (depending on your view of Argentinian history) First Lady of Argentina in the mid 20th Century, which is currently playing (at least until January 26, 2013) at the Marquis Theatre.

Evita Marquee

[Brief Disclaimer: I have been a great fan of and have seen most of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musicals, and Evita was the fourth and final of what I have dubbed Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical “Big Four” that I had yet see live on stage, the other three being Cats, Phantom of the Opera and Sunset Blvd. and designated as such due to the fact that each of those Lloyd Webber musicals won seven Tony Awards in the year they were nominated. This was the first Broadway revival of Evita since the original production played over thirty years ago, and it’s only now I’ve had a chance to see this production. Also, as I had not seen the original production, (though I had seen the 1996 film adaptation) my frame of reference for the musical is via the various English language cast recordings which interestingly enough, are different from one another (of course, aside from the different casts) – certain songs were changed, and others added in, most notably “You Must Love Me”, which was written for the film adaptation is now included in the musical’s score.]

As often the case, I had obtained my ticket via the TKTS board located in the heart of Times Square, which was fortunate, as it was a full house, aside from a few single empty seats. The show as a whole was great, from the sparse yet effective set design, the elaborate choreography and costumes, capturing the essence of post World War II Buenos Aires. Of course, the “star quality” draw for this revival was Ricky Martin, whose entrance was greeted with much applause – his portrayal of Che, the everyman narrator, was great, though for whatever reason, he elongated every vowel in every word he sang in the opening number “Oh What a Circus”, which seemed to slow down the tempo of the song. This did not occur as much in his subsequent songs, and his charisma shone throughout. As the titular character, Elena Roger, who has the distinction of being the first Argentinean actress to portray the role, she was fine acting-wise, but her singing was quite shrill and vibrato-laden; ironically perhaps, her voice became tolerable and more lyrical as the evening progressed, so that the lament she sings at the end was quietly poignant. But then again, having grown up listening to Julie Covington, Elaine Paige and Patti LuPone on the Original 1976 concept album, the London and Broadway cast recordings, respectively, (and later Madonna in the film adaptation movie soundtrack) the bar was set pretty high on how the songs were to be sung, and my expectations were equally as high. While not having the same amount of songs, Michael Cerveris was fantastic as Juan Peron, displaying a wide range of emotions throughout. Other standout performances were from Max von Essen as Augustin Magaldi, who belted out “On This Night of a Thousand Stars” with much gusto, and Rachel Potter, as the Mistress, who sang “Another Suitcase in Another Hall” with a balance of pragmatism and trepidation.

Evita Curtain Call -forefront (left to right):Michael Cerveris, Elena Roger & Ricky Martin

Evita Curtain Call – forefront (left to right): Michael Cerveris, Elena Roger & Ricky Martin

The stage door experience was a bit more eventful than usual or expected – I should preface this with the fact that the Marquis Theatre is located on the second floor within the Marriott Hotel, and the stage door is roughly a street block distance and on street level from the hotel doors, so there’s quite a distance to cover if one is to attempt to get a good spot to wait at the stage door. All this being said, I’m usually quite agile in getting to the Marquis stage door, and can usually secure a spot right in front of the metal barricades; however, knowing that there would be a larger than usual throng waiting (mostly for Ricky Martin, and some for Elena Roger), I made a mad dash to the stage door and perhaps my forward momentum combined with the occasional wind gusts propelled me forward too quickly and I stumbled roughly midway to the stage door. I was fine, nothing broken, (though I felt a bit bruised as I got up) and there was a tiny gash on my forehead, for which the helpful stage door security personnel directed me back inside the Marriott Hotel to get cleaned and bandaged up. As I (slowly) made my way back to the stage door area, a huge crowd already surrounded the stage door, as well as across the street (as there were cops on horseback on patrol ensuring the street was clear for the oncoming traffic) with the metal barricades a good six feet or so away from the actual door. The stage door security personnel who helped me had allowed me to wait on the other side of the barricade, closer to the stage door.  Probably a good twenty minutes or so passed before the cast started to emerge – of course there was a huge ovation when Ricky Martin came out, and he was good at signing as many playbills as possible before leaving via SUV, after which the crowd thinned considerably. Elena Roger, Michael Cerveris as well as ensemble member George Lee Andrews stuck around to chat and pose for photos.

At the stage door: Ricky Martin, Elena Roger & Michael Cerveris

At the stage door: Ricky Martin, Elena Roger & Michael Cerveris

Despite my aforementioned critiques, the overall production is great, and it’s a shame it’s closing – the official reason is that the producers were unable to find suitable replacements (as I believe Ricky Martin was to depart the show next week). I have a sneaking feeling that one of the reasons is that the producers could not find a replacement of the same celebrity stature as Ricky Martin; there are plenty of capable (albeit not well-known outside the theatre community) actors who could take over the role – Max von Essen, who does understudy for and has performed the role multiple times, could be a viable successor, but alas the business side of show business seems to take precedence these days. I’m glad to have seen this production, and would recommend it.

Signed playbill

Signed playbill

Even The Darkest Night Will End and The Sun Will Rise – Memories of Les Miserables

With the long-awaited, star-laden film adaptation due to be released on Christmas Day (about which I will expound my opinions as soon as I am able to see it), Les Miserables has returned to the US in a grand manner. While the stage production is still running in London (where it is the longest running musical), and there are countless touring productions all around the world, there is no Broadway production currently running, which is probably the only negative thing about Les Miserables at this moment. Thankfully, there have been several concert performances, namely the 10th and 25th Anniversary concerts that have been filmed that I can watch over and over in lieu of seeing a live production.

Les Miserables was one of the first musicals of which I became aware when I was growing up, and has become my all time favorite musical that I have ever seen live onstage. I first became aware of the score in grade school when the glee club (yes, I was in the glee club / chorus from the third grade through eighth grade) sang a medley of songs from the show, which had also prompted me to read the Victor Hugo novel, albeit the abridged version – tackling the 1,200+ page unabridged version was a daunting task for a nine-year-old to undertake. Les Miserables was also among the first stage musicals I ever saw (though I can’t recall who had been that initial Broadway cast – it was not the original cast), and is one of three musicals I have seen in the double digits [the other two being Phantom of the Opera and La Cage aux Folles].

Les Miserables marquee 2006

Les Miserables marquee at the Broadhurst Theatre, October 24, 2006 – January 6, 2008

I recall being crestfallen when the original production has announced it closing in 2003, and while I had been unable to obtain a ticket to the final performance, I was able to obtain one of the last tickets while waiting on the cancellation line to the next-to-last performance, which had been the first (though not the last) time I spent $100 for a single ticket – ticket prices back then were not as exorbitant as they are now. I also recall the utter joy I felt when I had read that to commemorate the show becoming the longest running show on the West End, the show would be revived in late 2006; that production was supposed to be a six month run, and ended up running over year and a half. This blog will therefore focus more on the revival production, as it is fresher in my recent memory, though there is one lasting memory I have from seeing the original production. Two months before its closing, Terrence Mann, who had brilliantly originated the role of Inspector Javert, returned to reprise his role, and I was finally able to see him on stage, ending years of my missing him perform live on stage [in the shows I had seen in which he was in the cast until that time – Cats, Beauty and the Beast, and The Scarlet Pimpernel – he had either been on vacation or had recently left the production]. Needless to say, he was astounding in the role, and remains one of my favorite actors to play that role.

The 2006 – 2008 Broadway revival production had non-traditional casting, meaning that race and ethnicity did not factor in casting the characters (who, of course are French). I loved the revival cast, which included Alexander Gemignani, Norm Lewis, Celia Keenan-Bolger, Aaron Lazar, Jenny Galloway, Gary Beach and Carly Rose Sonenclar (to name but a few) with one glaring exception – for whatever reason, Daphne Rubin-Vega, best known as being the original Mimi in Rent had been cast as Fantine. While she may have been fantastic as Mimi (full disclosure – I had not seen her in Rent, and I have the original cast recording to go by), she was terrible as Fantine, to the point where at the performance I had attended, the audience actually cheered when [spoiler alert!] Fantine died. That’s just not right. Thankfully, the succeeding actors to play the role – Lea Salonga and Judy Kuhn – were remarkably better, and interestingly enough had notably played two other significant roles in the past. Lea Salonga had played Eponine during the original run and Judy Kuhn had originated the role of Cosette, and both had reprised these roles in the 10th Anniversary concert. Other notable replacements during the revival run were John Owen-Jones as Valjean, and Max von Essen as Enjolras, both of whom were brilliant in their respective roles.

Whereas I was not able to attend the final performance of the original production, I was able to attend the final performance of the revival production on January 6, 2008, sitting the (right) box seat, which is an interesting perspective of the show. Seeing the show and listening to the score was, and is, one of the most moving experiences I have ever had in the theatre. Without fail, almost regardless of the cast, I’m weeping by the end of the show – just hearing the opening notes of “Bring Him Home” induces tears; it’s not all doom and gloom, though – there are moments of levity, most of which came from the opportunistic Thenardiers, in “Master of the House”, “The Thenardier Waltz of Treachery” and “Beggar at the Feast”, Gary Beach and Jenny Galloway were perfect in balancing their comic timing with underling menace to not let the audience forget that they too are the villains of the piece. Other moments of levity (whether intended or not) were provided by Adam Jacobs as Marius and Drew Sarich as Grantaire; Adam Jacobs had played Marius as awkward beau, with his hesitant opening delivery of “A Heart Full of Love”, which always induced giggles from the audience, and Drew Sarich’s brilliant portrayal of the drunken Grantaire during “Red and Black”.

IMG_0108

Final curtain call, Broadway revival: January 6, 2008

The stage door experience after that final performance was frenzied as always, though it does amuse me that more times than not, it’s always a chilly night whenever I stage door, and thankfully while it had been cold, it did not snow.  The cast had emerged to an enthusiastic crowd of fans and signed playbills and posed for photos, per usual. I truly believe that it is utterly impossible for anyone who has ever seen the show or listened to any of the cast recordings (and there are a lot of them out there, in multiple languages) to not be moved to tears by the music and the story that tells of the triumph of the human spirit in harsh and unforgiving circumstances.

Me with some of the cast - clockwise from top left (John Owen-Jones, Max von Essen, Jenny Galloway and Gary Beach)

Clockwise from top left: John Owen-Jones, Max von Essen, Jenny Galloway and Gary Beach

Nearly five years has passed since the revival production (and almost ten years since the original production) closed on Broadway – I can only hope with all the laurels the film adaptation is generating that a permanent revival will return. There have been rumors that the current US Touring production might find its way to New York City.

Brief update:  It has been announced that Les Miserables will return to Broadway sometime in 2014, though no specific date or venue has yet been confirmed.

Commemorative plaque right outside the Imperial Theatre

Commemorative plaque right outside the Imperial Theatre

A Good Nightmare Comes So Rarely, While Ordinary Dreams Are So Easy To Find: Ruminations on Dance of the Vampires

Vampires and vampire hunters have always been a ubiquitous and (for the most part) successful presence in popular culture – in movies, on television, in video games and of course, in literature; the one genre where this kind of achievement has proven to be elusive is on stage, particularly in the realm of musical theatre (at least on Broadway). Ten years ago tonight, Dance of the Vampires started its previews at the Minskoff Theatre (after a two-day postponement due to technical issues), and had been (at the time) the most expensive musical to be produced on Broadway. The show was an English adaptation of the German musical Tanz Der Vampire, which was, in turn, based on the Roman Polanski film The Fearless Vampire Killers and boasted a score by Jim Steinman, most noted for epic rock songs for Meat Loaf. The show also heralded the return of Michael Crawford to the Broadway stage since his definitive performance in Phantom of the Opera. There were great expectations for the show, and on the surface it seemed that it was destined to be a sure-fire success – sadly, the reality fell far short of the expectations.

[Disclaimer: Once again, in the spirit of full disclosure, my interest in Dance of the Vampires began when it had been announced that Michael Crawford would be returning to Broadway as Count von Krolock. I’ve already mentioned previously that Mr. Crawford is one of my favorite theatre actors, and I was greatly looking forward to seeing him live on stage – so this is advanced warning that parts of this blog will come across as highly emotional and quite possibly end up just being one quasi-coherent long rant. Also, as this blog is about Dance and not Tanz, there will not be any overt comparisons/criticisms between the two productions; again this blog, as with all my previous and future blogs, is of my own opinion and should be respected as such.]

I have already mentioned in a previous blog, the fact that Dance of the Vampires was slated to play at the Minskoff Theatre (which at the time was still “cursed”) did not bode well in my mind; added to the fact that there were substantial changes from its source material, Tanz der Vampire, to make Dance less dark and more comical was probably not a good sign either. I will not speculate on hearsay on the reasons behind these changes or other rumors on the goings on during rehearsals and such; I’ve never put too much stock in that kind of gossip and repeating them all these years late would perpetuate the initial incident, which could or could not have been something totally different. Needless to say, the changes were made, songs were dropped and other songs were added – would Dance have had a longer run had the plot and score been just like Tanz? Maybe, but then again maybe not; there’s no point in wondering what could have been, but to reflect on what did happen.

The plot of Dance of the Vampires revolves around the highly logical vampire hunter Professor Abronsius and his former theology student turned factotum Alfred arriving in the village of Lower Belabartovich in Transylvania to slay the last of the vampires, the charismatic Count Giovanni von Krolock. The Count, in turn, has his sights set on seducing Sarah, the innkeeper’s daughter, who is destined to fulfill an ancient prophesy that “vampires will dance in the light of the sun”. My initial and everlasting impression of the show was that it was highly entertaining, with a fantastic score, which included “Total Eclipse of the Heart” (which was always received with applause and laughter, mostly due to recognition). The set design was spectacular and the visual effects astounding, though I will admit that some of the early preview costumes for Count von Krolock were far too outlandish and unbelievable – thankfully the Count’s costumes were changed to be more in the same vein (pun intended) of the traditional image of vampires. Also I found it highly ironic for a show with vampires to have so much bright white light in it – artistically done, but it was all far too much.

The entire cast was astounding – having missed seeing Michael Crawford in Phantom of the Opera, I was delighted to have been able to see and hear him on stage in character (I had only seen and hear him sing in concert several years prior); he has a knack for comedy along with a flair for drama as the charming yet conflicted Count von Krolock. As Professor Abronsius, René Auberjonois, best known for his TV and movie roles, was equally brilliant; other standout performances came from Mandy Gonzalez and Max von Essen, as Sarah and Alfred, both of whom were vocal powerhouses destined for greatness. Also,  given the show’s title, I was amused and delighted that every cast member, at one point or another, did dance on stage.

Again, as stated in a previous blog, Dance of the Vampires had received the most hateful, negative “reviews” I have ever read, most of which were not so much reviews for the production itself, but seemed to be personal attacks on Crawford himself, and barely mentioned any of the other cast. All the print reviews were so similar to one another that I could almost believe that one critic had written the review and the other critics had used that as their template. I felt (and still feel) that this was deliberate, uncalled for, and most certainly contrary to what a critical review should be; I could understand (though not agree) that had these personal attacks been limited to newspaper gossip columns or internet message boards and forums, I would have considered them to be opinions of whomever had written them – everyone is entitled to an opinion, after all. I may not agree with them, but they have a right to them, as do I have a right to my own opinions.

The production ran a little over three months, and I was fortunate to have seen the show nine times within that time frame. This show was also the first show for which I had attended both the matinee and evening performance – the final two performances, which were highly emotional and enthusiastically received (if memory serves). I even recall overhearing some departing theater-goers question why such an entertaining show was closing, which was in stark contrast to an incident that happened to me shortly after the “reviews” came out. I had been outside the Minskoff Theatre waiting to enter the theater, when I stuck a conversation with some passersby looking to see a show; when I had recommended they see Dance I can recall the haughty tone of one of the passersby, who had accused me of being a shill for the show. When I had responded that I wasn’t, I was looked upon with suspicion and disbelief. Needless to say the incident startled me immensely and gave me some insight on how persuasive press reviews can be to the average theatergoer, as well as a sober lesson that even if “everyone” dislikes a show, there are some who love that same show, and their adoration should not be dismissed.

I can recall the stage door area being swarmed with theater-goers that final night, which was astounding not only for their appreciation for the hard work the cast and crew gave, but also due to the fact that it had been  quite a cold and windy winter evening (though it did not snow). Looking back at the show ten years after it started, despite the negative reviews, I thoroughly enjoyed the Dance of the Vampires and saw it for what it was – an evening of fun entertainment with great songs, brilliant staging and a fantastic cast. It’s a shame that an official cast recording was never made (if there is one, it’s never been released).

So it would seem the moral of this story is that singing vampires apparently do not and/or cannot succeed on Broadway – subsequent to Dance, two other vampire-centric musicals open and quickly closed – Frank Wildhorn’s Dracula: The Musical and Elton John’s Lestat. Though with the rise in popularity of vampires on film and TV these days, maybe there’s hope that Dance could possibly have a second life (or at least perhaps a concert version).

Michael Crawford as the Count von Krolock – his final (albeit blurry) appearance

Broadway in Bryant Park 2012: Rebecca, Sistas: The Musical, Chicago, Rent, Evita, & Newsies – August 9, 2012

For the penultimate 2012 Broadway in Bryant Park lunchtime concert, the apparent theme for the afternoon was one word titled musicals (discounting the usually ever-present “The Musical” descriptor) with grand showstoppers and loyal and vocal fan bases: Rebecca, Sistas: The Musical, Chicago, Rent, Evita, and Newsies. I arrived at Bryant Park that morning at my usual time and sat in my usual seat, and like the previous week, the weather was warm and sunny, but it wasn’t to be exactly as usual. Not too long after I settled into my seat, I was politely informed by one of the event volunteers that the row in which I usually sat (front center, on the lawn behind the gravel path where the press sat) as well as the rows to the left and right was to be reserved for VIPs. It was the first time this has happened (at least to me), so I moved to the second row on the left side, which was still a good view of the stage, albeit a smidge to the left. As always, the seats filled up quickly, with some opting to stay in the shade until the performance began. The 106.7 Lite FM host was Victor Sosa.

106.7 Lite FM host Victor Sosa

First to perform was the upcoming Rebecca, which starts its preview performances on October 30, 2012 at the Broadhurst Theatre, and is based on the book of the same name (from which the 1940 Alfred Hitchcock film was also based) by Daphne du Maurier. Stars Ryan Silverman, Jill Paice, and understudy Maree Johnson were on hand to perform four songs: Jill Paice sang “Free Now”, Maree Johnson sang “She’s Invincible” Paice and Ryan Silverman sang “Help Me Through the Night” and all three sang the title song “Rebecca”. I must say I am looking forward to seeing this show (and hoping it succeeds), which was originally produced and performed in Vienna (and in German) – the songs were grand, sweeping arias befitting the grandeur of the source material.

From left to right: Jill Paice, Maree Johnson & Ryan Silverman

Next to perform was Sistas: The Musical, an off-Broadway show about a multi-generational African-American family, currently playing at St. Luke’s Theatre, and was a “Broadway Bite” (though technically speaking the show is running off-Broadway) with the cast Tracey Conyer Lee, Lexi Rhoades, April Nixon, Jennifer Fouché and Amy Goldberger singing a pair of songs; I wish I could recall the first song they sang, but the second song was the oft-used family oriented anthem “We Are Family”, to which the cast encouraged the crowd to sing along (most did).

Cast of Sistas The Musical: Tracey Conyer Lee, Lexi Rhoades, April Nixon, Jennifer Fouché and Amy Goldberger

Next was Chicago, which is currently the longest running revival, playing at the Ambassador Theater, and is (as stated at the very start of the show) “a story of murder, greed, corruption, violence, exploitation, adultery and treachery – all those things we all hold near and dear to our hearts”. The cast members on hand were Donna Marie Asbury, Dylis Croman, Cristy Candler, Tonya Wathen, Tony Yazbeck, Peter Nelson, Amos Wolff and Denny Paschall; the songs that were sung were “All That Jazz”, sung by Donna Marie Asbury, “Roxie” sung by Dylis Croman, “All I Care About”, sung by Tony Yazbeck, and “My Baby and Me”, sung by Dylis Croman, all performed with the classic Bob Fosse choreography.

Clockwise from top left: Donna Marie Asbury, Tony Yazbeck & Dylis Croman

Next up was Rent, the off-Broadway incarnation of the modern adaptation of La Bohème playing at New World Stages until September 9, 2012. Cast members Anthony Federov, Sean Michael Murray, Emma Hunton, and Shaleah Adkisson were on hand to sing three songs: Anthony Federov sang “One Song Glory”, Federov was joined by Sean Michael Murray to sing “What You Own” and Emma Hunton, and Shaleah Adkisson sang “Take Me Or Leave Me”.

Clockwise from top left: Anthony Federov, Sean Michael Murray, Emma Hunton, & Shaleah Adkisson

Next was Evita, currently playing at the Marquis Theatre and tells the life story of Eva Peron, the former first lady of Argentina. Stars Christina DeCicco, Max von Essen and Rachel Potter were on hand to sing a trio of songs: Christina DeCicco sang “Buenos Aires”, Rachel Potter sang “Another Suitcase in Another Hall”, and Max von Essen and Christina DeCicco sang “High Flying, Adored”.

Left to right: Christina DeCicco,Rachel Potter & Max von Essen

The final performance of the afternoon was from Newsies, based on the Disney film of the same name, currently playing at the Nederlander Theater based on a true story about the trials and tribulations of teenage newspaper sellers at the turn of the 20th century. This was the show that had the most vocal fans present at the park, and presumably the reason for the increase in reserved seating. Cast members Corey Cott, Kara Lindsay, and Julie Foldesi were on hand to sing three songs: Julie Foldesi sang “That’s Rich”, Corey Cott and Kara Lindsay sang ‘Something to Believe In” and Corey Cott sang “Santa Fe”.

Left to right: Julie Foldesi, Corey Cott & Kara Lindsay & Corey Cott

 

Again, despite the warmer than usual yet typical August weather, it was  an enjoyable way to spend an afternoon.